Let’s Twist

Kaleider invites you to twist and shape our cardboard sculptures

Let’s Twist is a beautiful landscape of interactive sculptures. They are made out of interconnected cardboard prisms that can be twisted into thousands of different shapes. 

Every time someone changes the sculpture, they inherit their starting point from the people before them. By transforming the shape, they add to the sculpture’s story.

Members of the public can work together, or witness others playing.

 

Now available for booking.

An original commission by Children’s Capital of Culture, Kaleider’s Let’s Twist premiered September 2nd & 3rd 2023 at Rotherham Show.

Please get in touch with Kaleider Producer, Jocelyn S Mills to bring Kaleider’s Let’s Twist to your audiences: jocelyn@kaleider.com

Sustainability, accessibility & playability

Kaleider’s Let’s Twist is made entirely out of cardboard. The prisms are delivered flat packed and assembled on site, minimising the environmental impact of shipping. 

Let’s Twist was developed with access in mind. Cardboard is friendly and light: a 7.5 metre long sculpture can weigh as little as 11 kg. The sculptures can be twisted from all different angles and heights. Big twists always require more than one person, inviting collaboration, creative expression, and intergenerational play.

The shapes are beautifully architectural and can be painted with custom designs. The sculptures invite audiences to explore and admire them from all angles, changing people’s perception of their surroundings.

Gallery

Access documents

We will provide the following documents:

Easy Read in pdf

Easy Read in Word

Audio Description in mp3

Audio Description in Word

We are very happy to customise access documents for each promotor’s venue, location and language.

Credits

Original commission by Children’s Capital of Culture for Rotherham Show.

Let’s Twist custom designs for 2023 premiere at Rotherham Show created in collaboration with young people of Rotherham.

The Time It Takes

A participative experience that invites audiences to meditate on gravity and time.

What is it?

3 mechanical drawing machines use ever decreasing pendulum swings to mark the time it takes to fall to stillness.

Inspired by a childhood visit to Li Yuan-Chia’s remote little gallery in NW England and an old book of instructions for building your own harmonograph, Kaleider made 3 twin elliptical pendulum harmonographs (originally invented by Joseph Goold b. 1836). They are suspended from the ceiling, about 7m high.

In an attempt to mark each fall more beautifully than the last, the artist moves among the harmonographs and changes the weights. He invites the audience to seek harmony in the lines the machines draw.

 

This project is available for international touring.

The Time It Takes is an enchanting large-scale installation and a meditative experience. Artist Seth Honnor invites members of the public to initiate a harmonograph’s movement, and to witness as it draws a unique, co-created work of art.

If you want to discuss bringing Kaleider’s harmonographs to you and your audiences, please get in touch with Kaleider Producer Jocelyn S Mills: jocelyn@kaleider.com

Fish Mobile, a giant kinetic sculpture, hanging in Rotherham park. A crane reaches high above the trees, about 70 metres in the air. Five fish hang from it suspended on horizontal bars. It's a bright and warm summer day.

Fish Mobile

Transform your skyline.

A giant, breathtaking kinetic sculpture creates a moment of joy and reflection in public space. Next to the installation, people are invited to make their own small mobile to take the experience home. 

Fish Mobile premiered in Clifton Park, Rotherham July 26 – 28, 2022.
Fish Mobile premiers internationally at Fira Tàrrega September 8 – 10, 2023.

 

Available for international touring 2024

Book Fish Mobile to transform your outdoor venue or city with a beautiful and playful kinetic work.

Please get in touch with Kaleider Producer, Jocelyn S Mills if you want to discuss bringing Fish Mobile to you and your audiences: jocelyn@kaleider.com

What is Fish Mobile?

Giant kinetic sculpture

A giant balancing mobile hangs in public space, inviting people to stand or sit underneath it for as long as they like, to watch fish swim in the sky. Standing 70 metres tall, Fish Mobile transforms the skyscape with its gentle movement. 

Fish mobile workshop

In a tent next to the installation, people of all ages make their own small fish mobile to take home. The workshop is fun and free. It includes a printing press and is facilitated by staff.

#FishMobile

Audiences can send in pictures and videos of their finished fish mobiles via our social channels @kaleider. 

What people say about Fish Mobile

“It is so beautiful how it moves slightly in the the wind”

“This was so calming and chill!!!”

“The main piece was amazing and hearing it is being toured is even better. Really enjoyed making my little version.”

“I really like that it’s something completely different that’s never been done before.”

“All 3 grandchildren loved it.”

“I liked how it left me wondering about it after I’d left”

“I had the best day. Thank you”

Access

Click on the following links to download the documents:

Easy Read in pdf

Easy Read in Word

Audio Description in mp3

Audio Description in Word

This is a relaxed experience in public space. There are no additional lights or sounds. There is a massive crane that will raise and lower the giant fish mobile throughout the day so expect some mechanical noises from the crane.

We are very happy to customise access documents for each promotor’s venue, location and language.

Credits

Conceived and directed by Seth Honnor.

Head of production: Fiona Rourke.

Lead producer: Katie Keeler.

Rotherham Creative Producers team: Ace Smith, Mitchell Nuttall, Maltiti Musah-Razak, Eleanor Beever, Christopher Badger.

Fish Mobile is supported by IN SITU, the European platform for artistic creation in public space, in the frame of the project (UN)COMMON SPACES, co-funded by the European Union.

We couldn’t have done this without

The courage and conviction of Leanne Buchan and Rotherham Children’s Capital of Culture to commission a new work of this scale.

The encouragement and support of the In Situ network and Freedom Festival Arts Trust.

The fantastic efforts of the entire Kaleider team.

Fish Mobile is commissioned by Rotherham Council for Children’s Capital of Culture, supported by South Yorkshire Mayoral Combined Authority and the European Union European Development Fund.

Co-commissioned by Fira Tàrrega.

Arch

We are currently making this new work for international touring in 2024.

What is it?

Arch is an exploration of humans and materials, revealing the beauty and flaws of the global systems we imagine, build, and come to rely on.

It is an in/outdoor performance installation for audiences of up to 400+ that combines installation, performance, music and participation. Our aim is for performances to last for around 2 hours.

The audience witness an attempt, by two people, to build a freestanding arch, made two thirds of concrete blocks and one third of ice blocks.

A choir of local singers accompanies the performance in a continuous, musical vigil, framing Arch with fragility and hope.

Call for Citizen Commissioners

For 2 years, we have developed Arch with the help of incredible partners and collaborators. It is our most urgent work yet.

Now we’re asking for your help…

Will you support us by becoming one of 2000 Citizen Commissioners and donating just £10?

We’ll credit all Citizen Commissioners next to each performance of Arch on tour and here on our website.

You can donate in your name, your family’s name, or the name of someone you love. You choose.

Please help us to reach our target…

DONATE NOW

Summary

The performance will start with a single voice, singing; no language is discernible. Two people light a fire and begin to build the arch. They pile heavy blocks made of concrete or ice onto a former which holds them in place. It is difficult, nearly impossible. As they build, more singers join in the chorus, singing continuously for the entire performance in turns; sometimes stepping back, sometimes singing all together.

Finally, the former is removed and the arch stands. They drag the fire under the ice section of the arch, and step off the stage, mingling with the audience. Everyone waits, suspended, watching as the ice drips and melts. Champagne is served while they wait. Eventually, everyone witnesses the arch fall as the choir continues to sing.

R&D preview

 

Audience responses

People said about Arch:

The sharing yesterday will be one of the highlights of my time at the [National Theatre] studio and something I’ll remember for the rest of my life!

It was utterly captivating second to second, and theatre in its cleanest and most profound distillation.”

 

“It’s beautiful and it’s fascinating and it’s strange and the effort of the thing is, I think, what really kept me watching.”

“It moves from meditation to anxiety to fear to excitement to hope. It passes through a load of emotions which is really exciting.”

 

I was just heartbroken and satisfied within a matter of minutes.

 

Profoundly moved by today’s R&D sharing of Arch, new work from @kaleider – I felt such a shared commitment to witness human effort.

 

Access

Click on the following links to download the documents:

Easy Read in pdf

Easy Read in Word

Audio Description in mp3

Audio Description in Word

Arch is still in development and can be different each time it is presented. We are very happy to customise access documents for each promotor’s venue, location and language.

 

Credits

Arch research and development is supported by IN SITU, the European platform for artistic creation in public space, in the frame of the project UN(COMMON) SPACES, co-funded by the Creative Europe Programme of the European Union, and supported by Freedom Festival Arts Trust.

 

In Situ logo

 

Outside, several people, parents and children, walking towards a 10m x 8m canvas on which are painted about 15 different faces in bright colours. Behind is blue sky and the sun is shining.

Robot Selfie

Kaleider crowdsources hundreds of faces through a bespoke online platform, and then our robot paints them on a giant canvas in public space, creating a beautiful mural of strangers next to each other, in an act of togetherness.

 

Available for international touring 2022/23

Book Robot Selfie for your venue, city, or context to combine cutting edge technology with a high spectacle and participatory audience experience.

It’s covid safe, and will engage both an online and local live audience.

Please get in touch with Kaleider Producer, Jocelyn Mills if you want to discuss bringing Robot Selfie to you and your audiences: jocelyn@kaleider.com

How it works

1. Draw

First we have to draw the public. To do this we create a bespoke website for each promoter at robotselfie.live/<your place or city>

On that site the public are invited to have their selfies drawn by our non-learning AI. It is easy, accessible, fun, and free to take part.

2. Share

When they’re happy with their drawing they submit it to us. Everyone who submits a selfie gets a copy sent to them to print at home… or to use as a social media profile pic!

3. Watch the robot paint live

We then send a compilation of faces to our robot, which paints them on a giant canvas situated in public space. We like to paint for four days, giving the public the chance to submit their selfies and to see the mural emerge over time.

As well as watching the robot paint live in public space, we set up a live stream to robotselfie.live so that people can take part from anywhere in the world.

Audience responses

“Its extraordinary”

“Its amazing”

“Absolutely genius so intuitive”

“I’ve got a massive nose”

“THAT is intelligence”

“It’s like they’re all looking right at ME”

“We’re in the future.”

“That thing is doing that!?”

“I’ve never seen anything like it I love it”

“I love that it’s in my town. That’s amazing that.”

Access

Click on the following links to download the documents:

Easy Read in pdf

Easy Read in docx

Audio Description in mp3

We are happy to customise access documents for each promotor’s venue, location and language.

Credits

Conceived and directed by Seth Honnor, with Andy Wood, Thomas Duggan, Kris Sum, Fiona Rourke and Jay Kerry.

We couldn’t have done this without

Robot Selfie has received R&D investment through Without Walls Blueprint.

Robot Selfie is supported by Without Walls and commissioned by Brighton Festival and Norfolk & Norwich Festival.

Without Walls logo  Without Walls Blueprint logo

 

 

 

An iteration of Robot Selfie called A Portrait Without Borders, made for online audiences specifically in response to Covid-19 was originally commissioned by Freedom Festival Arts Trust in 2020. Part of the Creative Europe funded InSitu Network ‘ACT’ 2017-2020 as an international collaborative project in response to Covid-19. Supported by Digital Democracies and InSitu.

A phone is held up in front of a white wall with lots of faces drawn on it. The phones camera is enabled and so shows the faces in sharp focus.

A Portrait Without Borders

Kaleider crowdsources hundreds of faces through a bespoke online platform, and then a team of robots draws them on a blank wall. Perfect for galleries, empty spaces, shop fronts and conferences. A mural of people next to each other, together and yet apart.

This is the sibling project to Robot Selfie, where a robot paints pictures of the public, live, outdoors, in public space.

 

Available for international touring 2022/23

Book A Portrait Without Borders for your venue, city, or context. It’s affordable to freight and we can work with you to make an extraordinary event without our team needing to travel.

It’s covid safe, and can engage both an online and local live audience.

Please get in touch with Kaleider Producer, Jocelyn Mills if you want to discuss bringing Portrait to you and your audiences: jocelyn@kaleider.com

How it works

1. Draw

First we have to draw the public. To do this we create a bespoke website for each promoter at portraitwithoutborders.live/<your place or city>

On that site the public are invited to have their selfies drawn by our non-learning AI. It is easy, accessible, fun, and free to take part.

A screengrab of a website showing a toggle button toggled to "enable camera" below which is photographic image of a woman smiling. A screengrab of a website showing a toggle button toggled to "enable camera" below which is a line drawing of woman smiling.

2. Share

When they’re happy with their drawing they submit it to us. Everyone who submits a selfie get’s a copy sent to them to print at home… or to use as a social media profile pic!

3. Watch the robots draw live

We then send a compilation of faces to our robots which draw them. We can draw for between 1 day and several weeks, depending on the context.

As well as being able to watch the robots draw live, we set up a live stream to portraitwithoutborders.live so that people can take part from anywhere in the world.

Definitely worth it. Being part of a bigger something, while enjoying the #FreedomFestival2020 at home, has been great. Thanks @kaleider for always provoking me to think deeper and glance sideways to catch the truth. Xx

Access

Click on the following links to download the documents:

Easy Read in pdf

Easy Read in Word (docx)

Audio Description in mp3

We are happy to customise access documents for each promotor’s venue, location and language.

Commissioned by

Freedom Festival Arts Trust.

Supported by Digital Democracies and IN SITU.

Part of the Creative Europe funded IN SITU Network ‘ACT’ 2017-2020 as an international collaborative project in response to Covid-19.

Kaleider is an associated member of IN SITU, the European platform for artistic creation in public space, co-funded by the Creative Europe programme of the European Union.

In Situ logo

Buoyed

Buoyed is an interactive, playful cluster of magical glass buoys that hang above head height, suspended by slender wooden stems. They tease you with their pulsing glow and muffled voices, enticing you in for a closer listen. And as you reach them, they start speaking to you.

BellHouse

Conceived by artist and ceramicist Roop Johnstone, BellHouse is a playful, interactive sound sculpture that premiered at the EUPORIAS General Assembly in 2016.

Originally commissioned by the Met Office and Kaleider on behalf of EUPORIAS, BellHouse now revisits its roots of translating climate data for Climateurope September 2020 – January 2021. BellHouse is inviting delegates to share their data to be translated into the chimes of 34 bells, challenging how data is presented, communicated and miscommunicated. BellHouse asks:

How is your data heard? Who hears it? How do they interpret it? And what do they do next? 

BellHouse origins

BellHouse translated the non-verbal communication of the delegates presenting at the EUPORIAS General Assembly into the chimes of 35 bells. A motion capture system devised by the Met Office Informatics Lab activated striking mechanisms associated with each ceramic bell generating a continuous chiming whilst each speaker presented their research. 

BellHouse also played climate data sets during its residency at the Met Office such as Mt. Etna’s volcanic plumes, the European drought of 1976, solar winds, and 250 years of English and Welsh temperature and precipitation anomalies and reanalysis data based on citizen science.

You can watch a 5 minute Behind the Scenes film of the original commission here.

All about Roop

Roop works mostly with clay; he has made pots, sculptures, animations and installations. He is always interested in new ways to explore the material, but is not bound to it. In this case he is keen to use this opportunity to explore clay’s potential for sound, replacing other sounds (our voices) and movements with bell sounds. 

Roop is one half of RAMP (Roop & Al Make Pots), makers of thrown Earthenware and Porcelain functional and studio ceramics. They exhibit their work in galleries around the UK as well as at Craft Events nationally and sell to patrons around the world. They are members of The Devon Guild of Craftsmen and the CPA (Craftsmen Potters Association). Always interested in exploring new ways to explore ideas and material RAMP has collaborated with animators, designers, scientists and technologists on various projects over the years as artists and teachers.

Roop says:

I am interested in perceptive boundaries and how we think about things. That is to say, how what we think about determines how we think and (vice versa) how our thinking processes determine what we think about. I like the idea that the way that we collect information (through our respective senses and the inherent processes involved) creates patterns of meaning and understanding that are common to all of us, but also different on an individual and cultural level. BellHouse is a sculpture which aims to play with this on some level.

The Met Office, as a kind of information and data collection/generation hub is in a unique position to explore new ways of interacting with and communicating information which will either directly affect our behaviour (in an everyday sense) or influence patterns of behaviour and understanding on a much wider scale. The communication of cutting edge research in Climate Science is a clear example of this. How can we broaden the accessibility, engagement and understanding of this important research to a wider public?

Credits

By Roop Johnstone

Produced by Kaleider

Presented by Climateurope 2020

Originally commissioned by the Met Office and Kaleider on behalf of and funded by EUPORIAS, a project of the European Commission’s Seventh Framework programme

Current team

Artist: Roop Johnstone

Creative Technologists: Katja Mordaunt (Team Lead), Kris Sum

Producer: Jocelyn S. Mills

Documentation: Preston Street Films

Graphic Design: Jo Jones

Creation and Development teams

Original creation: Roop Johnstone (Artist), Alec Jefford (Electrical Engineer), Agim Shekreli and Matthew LeBreton (Carpenters), Emily Williams (Producer)

Met Office Informatics Lab Software Development & Prototyping: Alberto Arribas (Team Lead), Rachel Prudden, Niall Robinson, Todd Burlington, Michael Priestly, Theo McCaie, Anurien Thomas, Jacob Tomlinson, Thomas Powell, Alex Hilson, Ross Middleham, Dean Jones

Creative Technologists (development): Simon Belshaw, Ian Woodbridge, Pablo Toledo

 

     

 

 

Listening Trees

A co-production with Mercurial Wrestler

Listening Trees is the possibility of a connection with a stranger. When you sit at a Listening Tree it connects you to another seat somewhere else where someone else is sitting and you can talk and listen through the horns for as long or as briefly as you wish. When you leave the seat the connection is lost so when you sit back down you could be connected to another person on another seat, somewhere else.

 

In October 2015 we installed them across Torbay as part of Ageing Well Festival for their first trial.

Each Listening Tree is comprised of a handmade seat and horn which is attached to a pre-existing tree in a suitable location.

The technology is designed so that the project can be scaled by the infinite addition of new seats.